Johns Hopkins University
Fall/Winter 2006
Vol. 4, No. 1

NEWS

New Faces, New Digs

A Merger with Momentum

Stellar Achievements

Beyond the Ivory Tower—to Museums

New Faculty Arrive on the Scene

A New Schedule Aims to End "Binge" Learning

> Student Standouts

Faculty Books

Your Words


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Student Standouts

Fulbright Scholars

The Fulbright Program aims to increase mutual understanding through the exchange of people, knowledge, and skills. It awards approximately 1,000 grants a year and operates in more than 140 countries.

Seven Krieger School students or recent graduates will study abroad this year as Fulbright Scholars, and an eighth earned a similarly prestigious scholarship known as the DAAD from the German Academic Exchange Service.

The Fulbright Program aims to increase mutual understanding through the exchange of people, knowledge, and skills. It awards approximately 1,000 grants a year and operates in more than 140 countries.

Ted Blanton, a doctoral candidate in history, will travel to Spain to conduct research primarily on documents contained in the Archivo de la Corona de Arago-n in Barcelona. He plans to research how the relationships that he groups under the rubric “artificial kinship”—namely relations formed through adoption, wardship, spiritual filiation, and step-parenthood—worked during the period of 1000 to 1300 A.D. to establish and maintain the hegemony of the counts of Barcelona over the other noble families of Catalonia.

Warner Brown, who graduated last spring with a bachelor’s degree in history, will travel to Shanghai on a Fulbright scholarship to study the ways that city’s civic identity is represented in visual culture. He will examine the advertising and package and product design throughout the city and assess how advertisers tailor commercial art to localized taste and culture. He’ll be continuing work he started last summer in Shanghai with a Provost’s Undergraduate Research Award.

Teresa Cribelli, a doctoral student in Latin American history, will use the Fulbright grant to study how Brazilians from 1850 to 1889 conceived of modernization in terms of their own needs and circumstances. Studying 19th-century newspapers, reports on public work projects and government documents at institutions in Rio de Janeiro, Cribelli will also work directly with Brazilian historians.

Irene Kim is in South Korea on a Fulbright- sponsored one-year teaching assistantship in English as a Foreign Language. The 2006 graduate majored in molecular and cellular biology and plans to enroll in medical school upon her return.

Caitlin Kunkel, who graduated in May with a degree in The Writing Seminars, is an aspiring writer who will use her Fulbright to travel to Indonesia to teach English to high school students and write about the experiences of survivors of the 2004 tsunami.

Patrick Leland, a doctoral candidate in philosophy, is studying the contributions of German philosopher Immanuel Kant to recent philosophical accounts of linguistic meaning. He will conduct research at Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität in Frankfurt, consulting German scholars and archive materials. Leland also earned a DAAD scholarship, but declined it to pursue his studies through the Fulbright program.

Jake Lowinger, who is pursuing a doctoral degree in sociology, will travel to Croatia to conduct archival research in an effort to understand the relationship between labor mobilization and nationalist movements during the 1980s in what was then Yugoslavia. He plans to construct a database of labor actions based on local newspaper reports in an effort to understand the primary demands of organized workers and the extent to which the threat of successful labor mobilization led to the development of virulent nationalist responses.

Annemarie Catania, meanwhile, is headed to Germany for six months on a DAAD scholarship, offered through a publicly funded independent organ­ization of higher education institutions in Germany. Catania is using the time to further her dissertation work in the Classics Department, analyzing the imagery on Roman sarcophagi. Using the photo archive at the Sarkophag-Corpus, Catania is studying the scenes of festive processions and banquets carved or sculpted into marble coffins.

 

Goldwater Scholars

The Goldwater scholarship program, the premier undergraduate award of its type, was designed to encourage outstanding students to pursue careers in mathematics, the natural sciences, and engineering.

Three Krieger students were among the 323 undergraduates who received Goldwater Scholarships for the 2006–2007 academic year. The one- and two-year merit-based scholarships from the Goldwater Foundation, a federally endowed agency established in 1986, cover the cost of tuition, fees, books, and room and board, up to $7,500 per year. The scholarship program, the premier undergraduate award of its type, was designed to encourage outstanding students to pursue careers in mathematics, the natural sciences, and engineering.

Katherine Villa, a molecular and cellular biology major, works in the lab of Victor Corces, where she investigates proteins involved in DNA transcription. Hoping to someday teach at a university, Villa is the treasurer of Beta Beta Beta—the biology honors society—and she volunteers with Habitat for Humanity.

Wenqian Wang, also a molecular and cellular biology major, plans to pursue a medical degree and a doctorate to study eye disease as an ophthalmologist. Her recent lab experience included work with Elia Duh at the Wilmer Eye Institute, and she has co-authored two papers on pulmonary hypertension. She is a chemistry lab teaching assistant, publicity chair for Circle K, and a member of Beta Beta Beta.

A double major in neuroscience and anthropology, Kevin Chen intends to pursue a medical degree and a doctorate exploring the emerging field of neuroimmunology. He works in the lab of Lee I. Martin at the School of Medicine, where he studies the molecular mechanisms of neuro­degenerative disease. Chen co-authored a paper published in the Journal of Neuroscience in 2005. He belongs to Nu Rho Psi, the neuroscience honor society, plays the flute and piccolo in the JHU Band, and volunteers in the Child Life/Therapeutic Recreation Department at the Kennedy Krieger Institute.

 

Truman Scholar

Krieger School political science major Sarah David was one of 75 students from 63 colleges and universities to be named 2006 Truman Scholars. The prestigious annual award is given to extraordinary juniors committed to careers in public service.

The prestigious annual award is given to extraordinary juniors committed to careers in public service.

Winners received $30,000 for graduate study and are eligible for priority admission and supplemental financial aid at some of the nation’s premier graduate institutions. They also receive leadership training and career and graduate school counseling, and they have access to special internship opportunities within the federal government.

David plans to study international and comparative law. She spent last summer researching Jewish values in Fez, Morocco, on a Ripon-Clinger Grant from Hopkins and last fall attended the Arabic Language Institute in Cairo, Egypt.

 

Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellow

Don Selby, a doctoral student in anthropology, was one of 30 Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellows chosen this year by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. The fellowship, a highly competitive national award, provides $18,500 for 12 months of work on a dissertation in the humanities or social sciences that addresses questions of religious or ethical value.

Funded by the Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation, the award has supported nearly 1,000 doctoral candidates since its inception in 1981. Selby’s dissertation topic is “The Politics and Morality of Human Rights in Thailand.”

 

2006 Student Book Collecting Contest

The Friends of the Johns Hopkins Libraries recently awarded Krieger School undergraduates with prizes in the 2006 Student Book Collecting Contest. Entrants write essays about their personal book collections, along with bibliographies.

Kevin Clark, who is pursuing a dual degree in philosophy and composition (from the Peabody Institute) won first place in the undergraduate category for his collection, “A Composer’s Library: Volumes of Inspiration.” Political science and history major James Harlow took second place for his collection on colonial/revolutionary America titled, “Independence.” Karen Starr, who recently earned a bachelor’s degree in international studies, earned an honorable mention for her collection, “Russian History and Literature.”

works from the collection of kevin clark

Works from the collection of Kevin Clark, whose entry, "A Composer's Library:
Volumes of Inspiration," won first prize in the undergraduate category.